Monday, July 21, 2014

State Evacuates 430,000 Trout From Too-Warm Hatchery

Sacramento County - It was a desperate move to save precious lives - an evacuation of thousands of tiny fish from a state hatchery where they would have surely perished in water that was too warm, all because of the California drought.

On Wednesday, state Department of Fish and Wildlife workers netted the last of the 430,000 steelhead trout fingerlings from the Nimbus Fish Hatchery, trucked them to a boat launch about five minutes away and released them into the American River.

Nobody knows whether the 3-inch-long fish will survive, but they're expected to have a better chance than they would have had if they had been left in the hatchery tanks, which are filled with reservoir water piped in from the Folsom Dam.

The problem is that, due to the California drought, the Folsom reservoir is only 52 percent of capacity and the sizzling Central Valley temperatures are expected to heat the water to 78 degrees by August, a temperature that would have meant certain death for the young fish.

"That's too hot for steelhead. We expect they will have a better chance in the river" where they might be able to find cold pools of water, said Gary Novak, the Nimbus Hatchery manager. "The situation is pretty severe. I have to get rid of all my fish and then hope it rains next year."

The Nimbus Hatchery is one of 22 breeding facilities run by the state that supply most of the salmonids left in the ocean along the Central Coast. These hatcheries raise 30 million to 40 million fish annually and plant them in rivers and streams. The state's hatcheries were established decades ago primarily as mitigation for dam building, and experts say there would hardly be any salmonids at all swimming in the rivers if not for the breeding program.

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Friday, July 11, 2014

7,500 Gallons of Crude Oil Spills in Poudre River


Here We Go Again

A 7,500-gallon storage tank of crude oil has completely drained into the scenic Cache La Poudre, Colorado's only designated National Wild and Scenic River, southeast of Fort Collins.

Vegetation was covered by an oil slick a quarter-mile downstream, but authorities claim “no drinking water intakes have been affected.”

The environmental disaster occurred at Noble Energy facility near Windsor in northern Colorado, in imminent proximity to the popular Poudre River Trail, the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) reported late Friday afternoon.

Spring floods caved in the riverbank with a sat storage tank containing 178 barrels (roughly 7,500 gallons or over 28 tons) of crude oil. As a result the tank dropped from its foundation and broke a discharge valve, so all of the oil inside just flowed out right into the river, polluting the water and vegetation several hundred meters downstream.

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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Grass Carp on a Fly, Patience-Luck and Good Fly Selection Needed!


Summer Grass Carp Bite

Summertime is here and rivers are too high to fish, what to do? It's one of my favorite pastimes each Summer (sometimes Spring & Fall if time allows) is Freshwater fishing.

Most of you know that trying to catch a Carp on a fly is not an easy thing to do. When you attempt to target a Grass Carp, the stakes really beef up since these things do not like to eat, spook extremely easy, take a perfect presentation and lastly solid equipment to bring em in!

For the past 10 years, I have spent countless amount hours chasing the Golden Bonefish with maaaany frustrated outings, as well as break offs to remember. To really be good at Carp fishing, or even Grass Carp fishing you need to do some research. Where to find these fish, what Season to target -they can be much more active certain seasons than others, non spawn periods, time of day since weather is as important as your fly selection.





 
 If you Saltwater fish or looking to do more, Carp fishing can truly enhance those fishing skills needed to be a better fisherman. Sight placement and knowing how to read them is just as important as it is similar to Bonefish, Tarpon and Redfish.

Here in Colorado this is the next best thing so I will take it any day of the week! Can't wait to spend more time learning about these fish and if you really want to learn from the experts, check out a few buddies who know their stuff: Lee Novotny with The Fish Fly and Jeff Currier Global Fly Fisher

 
 
Nothing like catching a few Bass as well along the way, I will chase any Freshwater fish as long as the Carp are snoozing!


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